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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Soviet citizen found in the catalog.

Soviet citizen

Alex Inkeles

Soviet citizen

daily life in a totalitarian society

by Alex Inkeles

  • 222 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Atheneum in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soviet Union -- Social conditions -- 1945-,
  • Soviet Union -- Politics and government -- 1953-

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Alex Inkeles and Raymond A. Bauer with the assistance of David Gleicher and Irving Roscow.
    SeriesRussian Research Center studies, 35
    ContributionsBauer, Raymond A. 1916-
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxx, 533 p. ;
    Number of Pages533
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21210860M

    Immediately following World War II, life in the US was as good as it ever was. Most citizens were happy and living successful lives. At the same time, however, some were paranoid and feared Soviet invasion or nuclear war. Nuclear preparedness became a way of life, and many schools and businesses practiced duck-and-cover drills in case of an event. Soviet views of the United States changed once again after Mikhail Gorbachev came to power in early Arms control negotiations were renewed, and President Reagan undertook a new series of summit meetings with Gorbachev that led to arms reductions and facilitated a growing sympathy even among Communist leaders for more cooperation and the.

    Basing his conclusions on interviews with local deputies, observations of local soviets at work, and the analysis of a wide range of primary source material, the author finds that Soviet citizens do have some chances to participate meaningfully in local government and that a basis exists for the continued expansion of such by:   Solar Array Orbital Module Instrument Module Descent Module Soviet Citizen These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm : Ben Evans.

    Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for A Soviet American: Little Citizen of This Liitle World by Misha Mercedes (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products! Yes, we did know about Gulag. Only do not read Solzhenitsyn. His gulag books are work of fiction. We even know and understand reason for it. It was no just dictator madness for no reason. It was logical result of Soviet Union Industrialization. He.


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Soviet citizen by Alex Inkeles Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Soviet Citizen: Daily Life in a Totalitarian Society Hardcover – January 1, by Alex Inkeles (Author), Raymond Augustine Bauer (Author), David Gleicher (Assistant), Irving Rosow (Assistant) & 1 moreCited by: In their book on how Soviet society and the individual work, and play, the authors discuss the experiences of people from all walks of life.

They deal simultaneously with the whole range of activities in early family life on through school, work, marriage, recreation and politics. It explains The Soviet Union going from excellence, to a disaster.

Robert Robinson was an excellent man, it is admirable of how he managed to survive the brutal conditions of being an average Soviet citizen, which was caused by other (egoistic) citizens, who caused the Cited by: 9.

Much of the absence of documentary evidence of the Soviet regime—the destruction of personal archives and printed books alike—was a result of citizens. Sheila Fitzpatrick’s Everyday Stalinism, like many of her works, is concerned with the experiences of society under the Soviet regime rather than the state, but here she takes her research a step further and seeks to uncover what everyday life was like for the urban Soviet citizen in the s/5.

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Soviet citizen book. A seemingly innocent book about a traveller stuck on a deserted island, nevertheless this book made the list of foreign books unwelcome in the USSR.

The main fault of Robinson Crusoe is the idea that one man can carry out so many heroic acts. Memoir/autobiography of Soviet citizen Non-Fiction Readers. Join LibraryThing to post. He is an interesting character and the book covers so much of Soviet history and territory during that time that it is an excellent perspective for the time frame you are looking for.

I learned a lot about Russian culture and have a much different. My favourite is “Second Hand Time:Last of the Soviets’’ by Svetlana Alexievich which is a compilation of the personal accounts of Russians after the breakup of Soviet Union.

A lot of focus has been given to the major and minor changes of. In The Whisperers, Orlando Figes' new book about the impact of communism on ordinary citizens during Stalin's rule, Figes methodically documents the vast number of victims like Kaminska and her.

The film is based upon the true story of Soviet serial killer Andrei Chikatilo, who was convicted in of the murder of 52 women and children committed between and It stars Stephen Rea, Donald Sutherland, and Max Von Sydow.

The film is based on Robert Cullen's non-fiction book The Killer Department, released in Based on: The Killer Department, by Robert Cullen.

11 Insightful Books about the Soviet Union Worth Reading. The history of the Soviet Union has long fascinated me- from the start of the empire when the peasants rose up against the establishment and Lenin’s Bolshevik Red Army stormed the winter gardens to the fall of the empire and the events that led up to its collapse.

The divide between the extreme wealth of the Politburo and the poverty of Soviet citizens created a backlash from younger people who refused to adopt Communist Party ideology as their parents had.

The first chapter/prologue of that book is devastating. It really sets the tone. I loved too, how it painted a detailed picture of what daily life in the Soviet bloc was like even pre-Chernobyl. I don't know if that was intentional or just a fortunate side-effect, but I really enjoyed it. This book details the manhunt for the Russian serial killer Andrei Chikatilo.

What the book reveals about the soviet legal system is almost as frightening as the horrific murders perpetrated by Chikatilo; a number of innocents perished as a result of shoddy and criminal investigative and judicial practices.4/5. The Soviet Union Through the Eyes of a Soviet Citizen From Fourth International, vol.6 No.6, Junepp Transcribed, marked up & formatted by Ted Crawford & David Walters in for ETOL.

The rarest type of information concerning. Stalin's Citizens Everyday Politics in the Wake of Total War Serhy Yekelchyk. Examines Soviet citizenship through everyday practices of expressing Soviet identity in the public space.

Offers a new perspective on how the Stalin regime ensured near-universal political participation. As a result, Soviet citizens could not read many books, some of which are now regarded as classics - including Mikhail Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita and Boris Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago, not to Author: Oleg Yegorov.

Basing his conclusions on interviews with local deputies, observations of local soviets at work, and the analysis of a wide range of primary source material, the author finds that Soviet citizens do have some chances to participate meaningfully in local government and that a basis exists for the continued expansion of such participation.

The scholarly and readable Nine Soviet Portraits, by Raymond A. Bauer, author of an earlier book in the same field, The New Man in Soviet Psychology, is by far the best.

Bauer uses the fictional form to image the lives of nine typical Soviet citizens: a factory manager, doctor, secret police agent, student, tractor driver, creative artist, housewife, woman collective farmer, and.

The Soviet Citizen is an attempt to capture what the authors call the “social-psychology of Soviet life.” Rather than focusing on factory management, health care, or politics, as early HPSSS publications had, this volume concerns people and their daily lives.

Soviet people (Russian: Сове́тский наро́д, tr. Sovétsky naród) or citizens of the USSR (Russian: Гра́ждане СССР, tr. Grázhdane SSSR) was an umbrella demonym (politonym) for the population of the Soviet lly used as a nonspecific reference to the Soviet population, it was eventually declared to be a "new historical, social and international unity of.

Douglas Smith’s book, The Russian Job — The forgotten story of how America saved the Soviet Union from Ruin, reads like a thriller as he describes the Author of Becoming a Citizen Activist.The Communist Party of the Soviet Union arose from the Bolshevik wing of the Russian Social Democratic Workers’ Party (RSDWP).

The Bolsheviks, organized inwere led by Vladimir I. Lenin, and they argued for a tightly disciplined organization of professional revolutionaries who were governed by democratic centralism and were dedicated to achieving the dictatorship of .